No more punctures – plastic spokes for bikes instead!

Will this work? They have tried before, but this time, maybe it will.

No pump!

No pump!

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4432656/Airless-bike-tyre-uses-recycled-plastic-spokes.html

Wave goodbye to punctures! Airless bike tyre uses recycled plastic spokes for a smooth ride
The futuristic airless wheels are made from 100 per cent recycled materials
They reduce the effort required to cycle by lowering friction with the road
The design from Japanese firm Bridgestone could be available by 2019
By TIM COLLINS FOR MAILONLINE
PUBLISHED: 10:48 EDT, 21 April 2017 | UPDATED: 11:11 EDT, 21 April 2017

Getting a puncture is a frustrating experience for any bike rider, but it could soon become a thing of the past.

A new set of plastic tyres could consign bike pumps and repair kits to the history books.

The unique design does away with the air-filled inner tube of conventional tyres, in favour of rigid plastic spokes that support the weight of the bike and its rider.

A new set of airless plastic tyres could soon consign bike pumps and repair kits to the history books, by eliminating punctures +4
A new set of airless plastic tyres could soon consign bike pumps and repair kits to the history books, by eliminating punctures

THE BENEFITS

– Airless design means broken glass, sharp metal and other road debris pose no threat of a puncture

– Shock-absorbent structure will provide a smooth ride

– Will reduce the amount of effort required to cycle, by lowering friction between the tyre and road surface.

– Wheels are made from 100 per cent recycled materials

– Manufacturer says it is working on making the wheels themselves recyclable, to create an eco-friendly and sustainable cycle of production

The futuristic looking wheels use thermo-plastic resin spokes – a synthetic material that is flexible when heated and hardens when cooled – which means it can be moulded into a variety of shapes.

The spokes stretch between an inner hub and the outer rubber tyre, and have been designed to be shock-absorbent to provide a smooth ride.

And because they contain no air, broken glass, sharp metal and other road debris pose no threat of a puncture.

They also promise to reduce the amount of effort required to cycle, by lowering the friction between the tyre and road surface.

Tokyo-based manufacturer Bridgestone says that the wheels were created from completely recycled materials.

The firm is also working on making the wheels themselves recyclable, to create an eco-friendly and sustainable cycle of production.

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The wheels are currently a concept design, but the firm is hoping they will be available to buy in 2019.

The design is based on previous work by the company, dubbed the ‘Air Free Concept’, to provide wheels for cars and other motor vehicles.

The wheels have been in development since 2011, and in 2013 the company announced a second generation, which promised to deliver 60 km/hour speed (37 miles/hour) for ultralight vehicles.

In a statement on Bridgestone’s website at the time, a spokesman said: ‘There are developments and enhancements to be made before airless tires are available for consumers.

In 2013 Bridgestone announced a second generation of the tyres (pictured), which promised to deliver 60 kilometre hour speed (37 miles per hour) for ultralight vehicles +4
The new tyre concept for bikes (pictured) could be available for purchase by 2019 +4
The wheels have been in development since 2011 and in 2013 the company announced a second generation (left), which promised to deliver 60 kilometre hour speed (37 miles per hour) for ultralight vehicles. The new tyre concept for bikes (right) could be available by 2019

‘Finding a way to avoid trapping debris within the spokes, as well as developing the best way to distribute weight evenly and consistently transmit loads are a couple of these hurdles.

‘For reasons like these, many spectators think airless tires are still a decade or so away.

‘Despite this, the demand to keep up with the continuous advancements in the auto industry suggest that airless tires would be a welcome step forward for consumers as well as the auto industry.’

The technology also promises to reduce carbon-dioxide emissions in vehicles which adopted them.

A number of vehicles have already adopted the tyres, from quad bikes to golf carts. And the technology could reduce carbon dioxide emissions by reducing road friction +4
A number of vehicles have already adopted the tyres, from quad bikes to golf carts. And the technology could reduce carbon dioxide emissions by reducing road friction

The tyre manufacturer claims that about 90 per cent of energy loss comes from resistance created by repeated changes in the shape of the tyres as they roll.

By simplifying the structure, Bridgestone says it was able to minimise this energy loss, whatever the fuel source, be it electric, petrol or man power.

And a number of vehicles have already adopted these tyres, from quad bikes to golf carts.

It is unclear how much the airless tires will retail at.

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Steve, Christchurch, 1 day ago

It’s fine reducing the rolling resistance by reducing the foorprint (flexing of the tyre) until you want to stop quickly!

06Click to rate

Brenthawkinsmd, Redmond, United Kingdom, 2 days ago

Get mud on there and the tire will be unbalanced.

811Click to rate

Y ShouldIcare, WHAT U THINK, Anguilla, 2 days ago

again

20Click to rate

kev, essex in the pipe five by five, United Kingdom, 2 days ago

GASSSSSSSSSSSS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

40Click to rate

MayJam, Liverpool, United Kingdom, 2 days ago

Give it a rest. If it ain’t broke don’t fix it.

153Click to rate

Avanice, Arbourdale, United Kingdom, 2 days ago

Not new technology and it has been tried and tested on cars with limited amounts of success. Noise transmission to the vehicle is a major problem as are point impacts (pothole edges)

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Matt, Here and there., Germany, 2 days ago

It uses recycled plastic to make spoke not recycled spokes………Usual high quality reporting DM…………!

115Click to rate

morpethian, krakow, Poland, 2 days ago

My Dads Army fold away bike had solid tyres.There are a dozen companies marketing types of Airless tyres Tannus being to the fore.Nothing new .Hundreds of bikes are stolen every day.Would be handy if they could be tracked .

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glibDRIVEL, scismsville, Svalbard And Jan Mayen, 2 days ago

Expensive bikes are a heartache. Low cost quality bikes with tracking. THAT would be useful.

17Click to rate

Gernot Kramper, Hamburg, Germany, 2 days ago

They tried this system sind WWI -and it always worked out bad

09Click to rate

smiddy44, Ayr, United Kingdom, 2 days ago

A similar thing was done wit the moon buggy nearly 50 years ago, that’s how the tyres didn’t explode, dear conspiracy theory nutters.

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